Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog

Jaipur 2.0

|| Itinerary: Jaigarh and Nahargarh Fort ||

Day 1 was hectic due to the sweltering heat of the day (our Day 1 story at Jaipur). But a home-made foot spa in a bucket of salt water made us rejuvenated for our Day 2 trip.
We had to change our Cab for this day’s trip as we got a cheaper deal. (Quick Tip: always bargain with 2-3 tours and travel agents at least to get your best deal). Our plan for the day was short and simple: a bit of shopping at Badi Chaupad and visiting the Jaigarh and Nahargarh Fort by the evening.
Since both the forts are at distant (Jaigarh: 10 Kms; Nahargarh: 20Kms) from the city, we kept them for a separate day. We started late as the shopping areas open by 11a.m. We gave an hour in finding a Bandhini skirt and a traditional Kurti for myself. I will definitely show the skirt once I wear that !! 🙂
After this we went straight to the Jaigarh Fort. There is a provision to enter directly to the fort’s main entrance with your vehicle, but we opted to walk and explore the area.

Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| At the entry of the Jaigarh Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

Situated on the Cheel ka Teela (Hill of Eagles) of the Aravalli range, it overlooks the Amer Fort and the Maota Lake, near Amer. The fort was built by Jai Singh II in 1726 to protect the Amer Fort and its palace complex and was named after him. [Wikipedia]

Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Entrance to the Fort, Photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Jaigarh Fort Compound, photography by : Aparajita Paul ||

As we proceeded, we could see the enormous boundary walls of the fort with small openings for guarding the Amer Fort. The fort features a cannon named “Jaivana“, which was manufactured in the fort precincts and was then the world’s largest cannon on wheels. Jaigarh Fort and Amer Fort are connected by subterranean passages and considered as one complex.

Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Jaivana Canon, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Entry road to the Fort (not used now), photography by Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| view from the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| at Jaigarh fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

A central watch tower on a raised ground provides excellent vistas of the surrounding landscape. The colossal yet exemplary canon is a masterpiece of mechanics of that time. The stupendous sandstone structured walls used to protect the Amer Fort from attacks.

Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Watch tower at the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| a canon kept at the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Jaigarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| View from the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

After visiting the fort, we got a restaurant just adjacent to the fort. It was ok with the kind of food it served, but you won’t get any other options nearby. So, my suggestion is always to go local and consume what you get in such situations. We left Jaigarh after the lunch and proceeded towards Nahargarh at around 3:30 p.m. We experienced a heavy traffic on the way as it was the Sunday of a long weekend and all the visitors had come with their cars. 20 kms took us around an hour to cover.
This time I would suggest to take the car inside the front most entrance as there is nothing special to see in that area. You will get a T-zone after few meters. Explore the back of the fort – left from there, as there is a huge bathing area of the fort situated there. We mistakenly had taken that route and found out a dilapidated temple and that water-structure which were once connected to the fort. This took us around 15 mins and we arrived back at the right location. There is a wax museum right outside the fort (with separate tickets), which we didn’t feel like visiting. You might go for it if you have kids with you as they would enjoy the most.

Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Entry to the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

As we proceeded towards the main entrance of the fort, we were reminded that it closes sharply at 5:30 p.m. Nahargarh means ‘abode of tigers’. The popular belief is that ‘Nahar’ here stands for Nahar Singh Bhomia, whose spirit haunted the place and obstructed construction of the fort. Nahar’s spirit was pacified by building a temple in his memory within the fort, which thus became known by his name.

Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| at the Fort compound, photography by: Aprajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Door at the Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

The fort was constructed as a place of retreat on the summit of the ridge above the city. The Madhavendra Bhawan (main building), built by Sawai Madho Singh, have 12 identical suites for the queens of Jaipur and at the head was a suite for the king himself. While each of the King’s 9 wives was offered a 2-storey dwelling, the private living area of the Maharaja was constructed on the 4th side. The suites and rooms are connected to each other via hallways and boasts gorgeous frescoes in the interior. In addition, kitchen fireplaces and lavatories are built in this delightful fortress. The Women quarters were set up in a tricky way that the Maharaja could pay a visit to any queen’s room without the familiarity of the other queens. [Wikipedia].

Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| at the Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| at the Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Painted walls at Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
||at Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| from the window, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Post card ready, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| trying to pose, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| View from the terrace, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Planned city of Jaipur, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Terrace of the Madhavendra Bhawan, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Planned city of Jaipur, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| me at Nahargarh Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Designs on the walls were exquisitely adornable, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||
Nahargarh fort, rajasthan, photo credits aparajita Paul, travel photography, india, travel blog
|| Nahargarh Fort, photography by: Aparajita Paul ||

To enjoy the sunset, there is a restaurant in the Fort arena and it’s a kind of good deal to watch a sunset over the Aravalli range from this place. The Fort is amazing enough for a one time visit and charismatic enough for spending some quality time. We left the Fort when it was just about to close and hence got a few pictures of the sun getting down.
Thus, we completed today’s exploration in Jaipur. We spent the rest of the day at some food explorations, which I will tell you in the next post. So keep updated. See you soon!!

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